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I think most of you arguing about the law missed the post mheideman posted. It's an "average" that is broken down by class, and IS NOT NEW.

Why do you guys think Chrysler and Dodge have classified the PT Cruiser and the Magnum as a truck? And Chevy lists their HHR as a truck???? And I'm pretty sure the Nitro is considered a truck too. :D

Also, the article I'm linking to has some pretty interesting facts.
http://www.colby.edu/economics/faculty/thtieten/ec476/Austin.pdf

the EPA has noted that between 1981 and 2003, average vehicle fuel economy changed very little (increasing from 20.5 to 20.8 mpg), while average horsepower nearly doubled (from 102 to 197), weight increased by almost 25% (from 3201 to 3974 lb), and 0-to-60 acceleration times fell by nearly 30%.

I must admit, I hate taxes just like everyone else, but I would rather have the option of paying a tax for a high performance gas guzzling vehicle, than not having the choice at all.

mheideman said:
Here ya go: http://www.lawdog.com/transport/cp2.htm

You can do a google search, it turns up tons of results about the new law.

For those too lazy to click on the link ;) heres what it states:

Corporate Average Fuel Economy
U.S. Federal law encourages the use of fuel efficient vehicles in a number of ways. The first important concept is that of Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE). Manufacturers are required to meet certain mileage requirements on the vehicles which they manufacture. Separate calculations are made for passenger cars and the manufacturers choice of separate 2WD and 4WD truck categories, or "combined" trucks. Separate calculations are made for domestic (75 percent domestic content) and imported vehicles. These standards, which may be modified by National Highway Traffic Safety Administration, currently are as follows:

Passenger Cars 27.5 Mpg
Combined Trucks 20.0 Mpg
2WD Trucks 20.5 Mpg
4WD Trucks 19.0 Mpg

Calculation is the same as for "labels" (see below), except that actual production figures are used in place of projected sales. The CAFE is the sales-weighted average of all model types sold. The final average is adjusted to account for changes to the test procedures since the base year. All tests run for labels or other purposes are included in the calculation At the minimum the manufacturer must conduct sufficient vehicle testing to cover 90 percent of actual sales by configuration. Manufacturers conduct vehicle tests at their laboratories, and the EPA confirms about 30 percent of the vehicles at the EPA lab.

The penalties can be substantial. The fines are calculated at $5 per tenth of mpg above the target for each vehicle produced. The fines are collected by NHTSA which can grant exemptions and alternative standards. Credits can be carried forward or back in time for up to three years to offset fines calculated in other years.


The statutory basis for the fuel economy law is Title 49 U.S. Code Chapter 329.
 

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And I don't doubt that the 6.1, or maybe the 6.4 will eventually find its way into a 1500.

It would be interesting to see one in the Dakota too.
 

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There is a very specific reason this truck was modded this way. ;)







Garmon Diesel
 
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