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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a rockford 300/2 two channel amp. I have it bridges and running a single svc MTX 5500. Which i just blew. Im looking to get a JL W3. But do i want svc(single voice coil) or dvc (dual voice coil) and do i want it 2 ohm or 4 ohm? Sorry im not good with electronics,
 

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The Walt-n-ator
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It kinda depends on what you want to do with the sub. In my opinion, a dual voice coil (DVC) is better because you have more flexibility with wiring for the desired ohm load. For example, if you have a 4-ohm DVC, you can wire that sub for 2-ohms (less resistance) without parallel-wiring two subs together, or simply wire it in series for the standard 4-ohm load. There are several more variations involving different wiring styles and adding multiple subs wired together, but this is a common one. Basically, a DVC sub is very adaptable to virtually all situations. The point-the lower the ohms, the less resistance you present the amp=more power drawn from your amp. Just make sure that your amp can handle the ohm load; most amps aren't 1-ohm stable, but most are 2-ohm stable in normal mode, and 4-ohm stable in bridged mode. I have included a link to Crutchfield on sub wiring basics; there is also a tone of other info for you to up your electronics knowledge before you purchase anything. Hope this helps; good luck! Link below...
Crutchfield Advisor Click on the tab, "Learning center: Car Audio & Video," in the upper right-hand corner. This takes you to a section where you can click on multiple electronics for additional info and advice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
So if i am only running one sub i want the dvc 4 ohm?
 

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The Walt-n-ator
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You don't have to get a DVC sub if you're only running one sub; however, if you want to extract more power from your amp with one sub, you have to have a DVC to drop the ohm load from the standard 4-ohms to 2-ohms (unless the sub is already a 2-ohm sub in which case the DVC would allow you to drop it to 1-ohm, or if you buy a 2-channel amp and bridge the 2-channels). The DVC is simply a nice feature to have, but it is not required. For example, lets say you have a 1-channel(mono) amp that is rated at 300w RMS(continuous power) per channel in 4-ohm mode, but it is rated at 500w RMS per channel in 2-ohm mode; you have one 500w RMS sub with a DVC, you can wire the sub for 2-ohm mode and get the 300w amp to produce the above mentioned 500w simply by dropping the ohm load form 4-to-2ohms (you can't do this with a mono amp and a sub with a single voice coil). This is simply hypothetical; however, if you get one DVC sub, find a mono(1-channe) amp whose 2-ohm wattage matches the RMS wattage of your sub. There are many ways to get the desired combo of sub and amp; if this is still confusing, email me at [email protected], and we can't talk some more. By the way, do you already have an amp, or sub, that you want to use, or are you going to buy both?
-Matt
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
what would the rms be on a rockford punch amp 300/2 amp?
 

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The Walt-n-ator
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Not sure, do you have your booklet on the specs? If not, try to find the specs at RF.com.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Rated Power 75 W x 2 @ 4 Ohms RMS
150 W x 2 @ 2 Ohms RMS
300 W x 1 @ 4 Ohms bridged RMS

Total Power 300 Watts


I was thinking of a w3 what do you think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
im not sure but i blew a SVC Mtx 5500. I think im going to get the 4 ohm.
 

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The Walt-n-ator
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What size w3, and how many ohms? The DVC isn't really necessary if you plan on just running one sub, you should be able to just bridge the 4-ohm w3, if it can handle 300wRMS. The DVC is good if you wanted to use two subs because you could wire both subs for 2-ohm mode and run 150w to each sub on each of the two channels. On a side note, you can wire 2 SVC subs in parallel to achieve a 2-ohm load, but you would be splitting that 150w between two subs (instead of sending all of the power to one sub), so you would really be putting 75w to each of the two subs per channel. I hope this is clear. If I had to choose, I would base my choice on if I planned on adding another sub in the future. If you only want to run one sub and be done with it, get the SVC 4-ohm sub. A DVC sub is not a must, it just allows some flexibility for increasing the power of your existing amp. Good luck
-Matt
 

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'11 5.7L R/T Classic
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eaton said:
For example, if you have a 4-ohm DVC, you can wire that sub for 2-ohms (less resistance) without parallel-wiring two subs together, or simply wire it in series for the standard 4-ohm load.
Just a minor correction with that statement. A DVC 4 ohm sub can only be wired to a 2 ohm load or an 8 ohm load. It is possible to wire it to 4 ohms, but you basically just don't wire one of the voice coils, which gives you half the rated power(500 rms wiring 1 coil = 250 rms capability), and can cause premature wear on the sub and possibly even blow it. If you try to hook up a 500 watt rms amp to the one coil, you'll be throwing twice as much power as it could handle at it.

2 ohm stable monoblock amps aren't hard to find, in fact I haven't seen a class D that wasn't 2 ohm stable. 1 ohm stable is rather common as well, and will give you upgrade room, just make sure its putting out the right RMS at the right resistance for the one sub.
 

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'11 5.7L R/T Classic
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oops, just re-read your first post saying you were bridging a 2 channel. Most 2 channels are only 4 ohm stable when bridged, so be careful about that.
 

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If your going to use 1 sub for now but have any chance of using 2 in the future this is the way to do it. Lets just say your sub needs 300w RMS and its 4 ohm, you should buy a amp that puts out ATLEAST 600w bridged at 2ohm mono. That way for now you can run it at 4 ohms and you should get 300-350w for your sub. When you add the next sub the impedance will get cut in half and the amp will still deliver 300w to each sub. If your going to use a 4 ohm mono amp then just use 8 ohm subs instead. It's not that complicated.
 

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I agree with joefox.

This is the amp that has exactly what you need.

http://www.alpine-usa.com/en/products/product.php?model=MRP-M650

Best choices to use with THAT particular amp:

one or two SVC 4 Ohm up to 400 W RMS,

one or two DVC (2 Ohm each coil) up to 400 W RMS

One SVC 2 Ohm sub up to 600 W RMS

One DVC (4 Ohm each coil) up to 600 W RMS.


Barring buying a new amp... and keeping the 300W @ 4 Ohm amp, you should get.

One SVC 4 Ohm sub

or,

One DVC (2 ohm each coil, wired in SERIES) sub.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
So that would be a DVC 4 ohm correct? Yea im keeping my amp i dont have the cash to buy a new one.
 
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