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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
It's a bit late for many, but I just wanted to post this.

If you live in an area where the roads are sometimes salted due to ice, a good thing to do before the salt gets in there is to take the time to undercoat the under body of your vehicle.

Even if your vehicle has already been exposed, on a good dry day when the temps are reasonable, you can wash out the salt at a car wash and still apply a protective rubberized undercoating.

I've done this for decades, even though the roads where I live never get salted. I just do it as extra protection for the under side of the frame and rocker panels. It's not too difficult to remove the plastic liners and get a good film of rubberized undercoating into the seams and on the inside of the panels.

I usually make a day of it on a nice spring day. In advance I get a disposable tyvek hazmat suit for about $10, a pair of disposable goggles and plenty of nitrile disposable gloves. And of course about 5 or 6 cans of rubberized undercoating spray.

Then I remove all the plastic fender covers and go to town.

I get underneath the vehicle and seal up every seam I can find. Same with the inside of the rocker panels and anywhere I can get the coating.
It also has the effect of adding sound deadening so the vehicle ends up being quieter on the road.

I love maintaining my vehicles. I find it very rewarding and actually relaxing at times. Not always though.

The better you protect your vehicle, the longer it will last.
 

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It's already December in far northern Minnesota. What are these "reasonable temps" of which you speak?:wink
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
It's already December in far northern Minnesota. What are these "reasonable temps" of which you speak?:wink
lol

I guess it's relative. Right now in International falls MN it's around 9 degrees. Where I am right now it's 77 degrees.

"Reasonable" where I live would be mid 70's in the dead of winter.

Where you live, anything above freezing ?

Granted, some people hate warm weather and thrive in the cold. But I agree that doing any undercoating outdoors in the winter where you are could be challenging.
 

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As for other prep, mine already had a block heater, I transferred the battery heater from my (now dead) Trooper a couple weeks ago and tomorrow I'm changing the oil and filter. I should also check the antifreeze strength. While for most 50/50 is good enough, I heard when I was in Alaska a few months (decades ago) that 60/40 is near the maximum freeze protection for the commonly available automotive antifreeze (much higher and slush/freeze protection goes down again).
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
As for other prep, mine already had a block heater, I transferred the battery heater from my (now dead) Trooper a couple weeks ago and tomorrow I'm changing the oil and filter. I should also check the antifreeze strength. While for most 50/50 is good enough, I heard when I was in Alaska a few months (decades ago) that 60/40 is near the maximum freeze protection for the commonly available automotive antifreeze (much higher and slush/freeze protection goes down again).
Does the block heater stay on all the time the vehicle is parked or is it on some sort of timer?

I tried living not too far from where you are at one time. 15 minutes later I sold my house and moved to the tropics.
OTOH, mom loves the cold. Would prefer to live where you are.
 

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Does the block heater stay on all the time the vehicle is parked or is it on some sort of timer?
Only as long as it's plugged in. And you can control when it's on by plugging it into a timer or thermostat. For t-stat control, I've had trouble finding any adjustable down to a 0°F or lower turn on (don't usually need it above that), so I normally wait 'til bedtime to plug it in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Only as long as it's plugged in. And you can control when it's on by plugging it into a timer or thermostat. For t-stat control, I've had trouble finding any adjustable down to a 0°F or lower turn on (don't usually need it above that), so I normally wait 'til bedtime to plug it in.
Block coolers might sell better here :smile

What about the washer fluid tank? Do you just drain that in the winter?
 

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Washer fluid has alcohol, another antifreeze (I think they used alcohol in radiators 100 years ago). If it gets too cold for that, I think it just slushes up rather than freezing solid and splitting lines, tanks and pumps.
 
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