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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been thinking about leveling my '02 Quad cab, I just can't decide how I want to do it. I thought all along I would just crank the torsion bars, but I've also considered new keys. The question I'm confused on is how every key manufacture claims that it maintains factory ride. How? By putting different keys, that rotate the torsion bars further than factory (the exact same thing adjusting the screws does), it then lifts the front end. I'm obviously missing something here, so I was wondering if anyone could help me out. How are buying the keys better than just cranking the factory ones? Thanks.
 

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I'll generalize and go over the key[pun] points as I haven't got under a 1500 lately.
The torsion bar gives you travel by twisting and returning to static shape. The static shape[preloaded] gives the bar it's carrying capacity. When you load them up more by turning[adding more preload] you increase this capacity[like swapping a diesel spring in a 4.7 truck]. Yes it will sit higher but it will fight flex more as it has a greater ability to support weight[harsher stiff ride]. The torsion bar is hexed[sometimes threaded] at each end. The more you rotate one side, the more it tries to rotate the other. This rotation pushes the a-arms downward[the lift].
The key gets away with rotating one end and not as much on the other by changing the hex orientation[where the hex sits in correlation to the foot]. By doing so the preload is allowed to stay closer to normal setting and yet rotate enough at the other end to get the lift.
So in the simplist of terms, it's cranking without having to crank and suffer a stiffer ride.
Hope that helped [I think I left something out, working on no sleep for 2 days]
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm still confused, that doesn't make sense to me. I understand how the lift is attained. One end of the bar is in the a-arm, the other in the "key". By rotating the "key" you create more torsional stress in the bar, which is transfered to the a-arm, resulting in a lift in the stance. By putting a different key, that is just indexed differently than the stock one, basically rotating the bar w/o rotating the key from its stock configuration, you obtain a lift also. The only difference is really the key orientation, and how much of an impact does that have on ride quality. The only reason I see to use keys is the potential for more lift. There may be a situation that you would "run out" of adjustment on a stock key, due to worn/fatigued torsion bars. Anyone else have input.
 
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