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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
On my Dakota I had the same noise. Turned out to be the rear end. The rear end crapped out. The driver's side bearing that supports the differential in the axle housing went bad. Swapped the rear end out. Now no noise. Check it out. Won't cost you anything but some time. Check axle end play, check pinion shaft for side play at yoke as well as end play at yoke.
Thank you 44MagLeo.

I will definitely check the rear end axle end play and the pinion shaft when I jack my truck up to mount the original-sized spare tire on the right front as a test.

I can't think of any examples off hand, but so many times in troubleshooting problems over the years, I have found conditions or events that you could never have imagined would cause a specific problem, yet they were in fact the source of the problem.

This is just the kind of real-life experience I was hoping to uncover.

Thanks to everyone for these good and experienced-based problem solving suggestions. I will let you know how I make out.

Regards,

Lowboy
 

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That's what I would check is the differential check fluid level if it ever gets to low it gets hot and the whine will never go away even if you fill it. It will still work unless it's to damaged but it will always whine
 

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Discussion Starter · #23 ·
That's what I would check is the differential check fluid level if it ever gets to low it gets hot and the whine will never go away even if you fill it. It will still work unless it's to damaged but it will always whine
Thanks dmalou123. No problem with the fluid level. I just changed out the fluid at 100,000 miles in the spring.
 

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Discussion Starter · #24 ·
Today I mounted the stock spare tire first on the right front, then on the left front. Basically that did not make a difference in the humming noise.

Friday, I am bringing the truck back to Daigle's, the most experienced alignment shop in the city to see if they can test drive it and dig deeper into the drive line and rear wheels. Maybe they can spin all the wheels using their dynamic balancer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #26 · (Edited)
I went to the alignment shop today. The mechanic had me drive the truck with him as the passenger and he agreed the whining noise was not normal. He then did exactly what I thought he might do. He spun the front wheels with his wheel spinner. The passenger side bearing--the one I replaced--was quiet and smooth. The driver side bearing exhibited a loud and rough roaring noise.

The shop is installing a new wheel bearing assembly on the driver side now. We believe there is a 99.9 percent chance that this is the problem.

I will keep you posted.

Lowboy
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
Case closed.

Replacing the driver side wheel bearing eliminated the whining. So happy now.

The whining noise was originating from the driver-side wheel bearing even though it sounded like it was coming from the passenger-side wheel bearing. Not only did the whining sound like it was coming from the front passenger-side wheel, but as noted above, when we unloaded the passenger-side wheel, the noise disappeared. So we were totally faked out until we spun the wheels.

Thanks again to everyone who offered ideas, particularly Waygust7 and Andygears who suggested the correct solution. Lesson learned there.

Regards,

Lowboy
 

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Hopefully, you can pull out from your memory bank one of those rare and surprising solutions for a problem that is reported often but for which the proposed and obvious solutions are not working for me.

I have a 2005 Dodge Ram 1500 short bed, 2WD, with the 5-speed automatic transmission and 4.7 L engine. Purchased new, never damaged, maintained by the book. Runs as perfect as a truck can run except for the following problem.

— Humming-whining-whirring noise seemingly from the right front.
— The loudness and frequency increases with vehicle speed.
— When I unload the right side by taking a right-hand turn, the noise goes away.
— If I load the right side by taking a left-hand turn, noise volume and character do not change.
— If I coast in neutral, there is no change in the noise characteristics.
— if I change gears but keep the speed the same, there is no change in the noise characteristics.
— When I brake or accelerate, no change in the noise characteristics.

I have fifty years as a car enthusiast and Saturday mechanic, working on all my cars old and new, specialty and non-specialty, and I am stumped. I would appreciate your critical thinking on possible causes and how I would test for the cause. My truck is almost 18 years old and in near perfect condition and I want to drive it for ten more years, but the whining noise makes it sound like a schlock rod.

BACKGROUND
I have eliminated tire noise, improper wheel alignment, and worn wheel bearing. Here is the story.

1. I don’t know when the humming-whining-whirring noise started (hereafter let's call it the whining noise) because I ran a Gibson Super Truck muffler for many years and the muffler covered up any noises that might have developed either gradually or instantaneously.

2. The truck came with P245/70R17 tires. I installed much taller P255/75R17 M&S on the stock wheels during the time I had the Super Truck muffler installed.

3. When I removed the Super Truck muffler near the end of the service life of the tires, the whining noise was present.

4. I removed the worn tall tires and replaced them with similar tall tires (P255/75R17 M&S). The whining noise remained. I rotated the tires after 2,000 miles. The noise was still there.

5. I had the best and most experienced alignment expert in the city check and adjust the front-end alignment. He worked on it for two hours due to the fact he missed the front springs dropped 3/4 of an inch over time, and he had to redo the camber. He noted the whining noise and said to keep an eye on the right front wheel bearing, though he said there was no play in it.

6. I eventually replaced the right front wheel bearing with an OEM wheel bearing, because, well, it sounded just like wheel bearing noise. That was a waste of money as the whining remained.

7. When I unload the right side, there is zero tire noise from the tires. Truck is very quiet. So that eliminates tire noise.

Thanks for reading this far. Here are some unqualified guesses on my part: transmission output shaft bearing, drive shaft universal joint, wheel or suspension resonance set up due to tall tires, transmission.

Thanks for any suggestions you can offer.

Regards,

Lowboy

View attachment 632036
The problem is right there in the picture. The truck is way to clean and has been over maintained. Get it out in the mud and put a few dents in it. 👍 nice truck.
 

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That made me laugh. I have been known to try and fix a problem that is not really a problem only to create a real problem. 😀
I was hoping to get some nice photos to post after fixing the wheel bearing and doing self-service to replace a cold leak at the radiator housing. Then as I dug into the cold leak, I believe I found a leak at the water pump. So the truck is in the garage for the cold winter months until the weather warms up. Then I can comfortably and accurately diagnose the leaks and repair them. Hopefully, I will be able to take some nice photos of a perfect running truck by April.
 
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