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Okay one thing to make sure of is that when you put the mechanical fuel pump in there you got the arm underneath the cam lobe. you can prime the car by having someone crank over the engine and with a squirt bottle shoot fuel down the carb or you could use starting fluid spraying that in the carb and then cranking it up and see if it'll catch and then it'll start pulling fuel. Some carbs have a area where you can actually fill the float bowls with fuel as well but you can probably just Google that.
Bk

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Discussion Starter #22
I am pretty sure I have it underneath, but I'll pull it to be certain.

I will try that as well, thanks. I'll report back what happens.
 

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Havent logged in here in quite a while and read most of the thread lol.

Testing a mechanical fuel pump can be as simple as cycling the lever with your hand and the unit in a vice with a finger over the inlet to feel vacuum. Alternatively, hook a hose to the inlet / a gas can -- then crank and have a helper watch the outlet or setup as desired -- you get the picture / be creative. When I don't feel like cleaning a tank to check a motor I remove the inlet fuel line and hook up a lawnmover tank somewhere below the hood.

Always check that the inlet is the inlet -- chineesium alloy varies in quality. I once had one out-of-box where the inlet was the threaded flare fitting for the carb's stock hard line & the outlet was the hose nipple... ie built completely in reverse... worked but backwards lol.

That said it's not uncommon to simply be losing vacuum somewhere. Any small hole in the line before the pump can cause you to not pull fuel. When the lines age and fail they cause a hot stall, then after cranking will run a while and do it again. Replacing hoses always make sure the nipples are clean and good. If you remove the old with a razor be easy and don't dig into the steel (or plastic...) as that causes leaks at times.

Btw the pump doesn't NEED to be mounted below the fuel tank. I have a truck running a cheapy no name electric that's mounted so the lower end of the pump is tangent to the plane of the tank bottom & mounted in the bottom of the frame rail. Been running that way for years. In reality the more vacuum the pump must produce I would imagine reduces it's life tho... If mounted actually above the tank I do know that does not work -- but mid way, your results may vary -- the threshold is somewhere lol.

If you think the system may be plugged, then you can pull the fuel cap -- get an old champagne cork and run a drill through it -- then take the open discharge line from the fuel sender and direct it into a tank which will vent freely -- support safely of course -- and add light pressure to the tank. a little bump or two of compressed air should be plenty so make sure not to pressurize the tank. That's not a safe way to CLEAR a clog.

Just some musings from reading the thread.
 
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