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I am trying to remove my OEM front shocks to replace with Bilsiens. I cannot get the lower bolt out. It is rusted pretty good in there. My friend from the local Dodge dealership says i will have to replace the lower control arm. He says it happens a lot. I have been soaking it with penetrating fluid. Any recommendations?
20200530_170308.jpg
 

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If you can get one on it, try an impact wrench, both ways. Just a few seconds one way, then a few the other way, until it starts to come out. Keep reversing as you back it out.

If not, try a long arm wrench, and try to both tighten and loosen it.

Next step is to torch it. But plan on replacing that bushing if you do.

RwP
 

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Drifter99
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Yep
628776
- they are available. This is for a 2008 Ram 1500 5.7 4WD. RockAuto has it as a Strut Mount Bushing. I believe Napa sells them as well.
 

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I just went through a similar issue with a different car, but the same principles apply.

The problem is, obviously, rust inside the ferrule through which the bolt runs, they should be assembled with some grease or something in there.

Belting it is highly unlikely to achieve anything, as it wouldn't in our case, so using an angle grinder with a thin cutting blade you cut through the ferrule and the bolt each side of the bush. You will find at some point on the end showing on the left of your pic that cutting it so far will result in you being able to twist the end of the bolt off with a decent bar and socket, you'll definitely need a new bolt then too.

Torching is unlikely to do much, in my opinion, as the rubber will melt or burn out before the rust comes free.
 

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Using an impact on it probably isn't going to be all that helpful, since the rubber of the bushing will just absorb the impacts, and you'll end up tearing the tube loose from the rubber, and it'll just spin. Since the tube is stopped by the shock, I'd just hammer the hell out of it and hope for a miracle. It can't be rusted that tight, it doesn't even look that rusty. If you destroy the bolt or shock it's irrelevant, since you're going to replace it anyway.
 

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If it hasn't worked yet it probably won't work. Rust holding the bolt into the ferrule can be a tough nut to crack.
 

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First order a new bolt, second cut off the bolt, third center punch the bolt and starting with a 1/8 cobalt drill bit driil through the center of the bolt and keep increasing the drill size by 1/8 increments, eventually you will have shell of a bolt that you can chisel out or drill it all the way if needed.
 

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Autozone and other parts shops has tools you can borrow/rent----if you get the balljoint/universal joint press tool----you can push the bolt out---it's not a walk in the park but little patience you can get it out--- the press tool will have a hole in the anvil end (for using different size bushings) this will give you an opportunity to use a socket wrench to give you added ability to twist bolt as and while pushing it out
 

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As a shop owner for over 50 years I have my own pullers and presses. Sometimes they are just too rusted. I have removed the lower arm and put the whole assembly in my 50 ton press in some cases. Drilling always works.
 

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As a shop owner for over 50 years I have my own pullers and presses. Sometimes they are just too rusted. I have removed the lower arm and put the whole assembly in my 50 ton press in some cases. Drilling always works.
yes it does if you go that route as in last resort but surmising that this person doesn't have a shop and from the picture it appears not as severe as your implying---the methods I described are for the person with limited shop equipment----there are other methods that can be used such as resistance heating thru bolt but the availability of that equipment is few and far between but the equipment can be mfg or home built
 

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I think a drill is limited shop equipment, and looking at a picture doesn’t tell anything about how well fused those parts are.
Resistance heating of the bolt is not what is needed, the bushing needs to be heated quickly so it could expand away from the bolt. Not something that can be accomplished with it being molded to rubber.
 

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Like I said before, 1mm cutting disc in an angle grinder, cut through the centre ferrule of the bush as well as the bolt, replace bush and bolt.

But the reality is that the OP has now completed this job and it would be nice if he came back and let us know how he did it and how he got on.
 

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I think a drill is limited shop equipment, and looking at a picture doesn’t tell anything about how well fused those parts are.
Resistance heating of the bolt is not what is needed, the bushing needs to be heated quickly so it could expand away from the bolt. Not something that can be accomplished with it being molded to rubber.
Truth of the matter is that the chances of saving that rubber bushing is limited cause if and when drilling, it breaks loose it's history anyways---the resistance heating if done correctly will just disturb the molecular rust bond between the two but I still lean towards the universal joint press tool---vibration of the bolt while under pressure will aid to the bolt to break free
 
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