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RamVanMan
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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
Hey all:

Just a quick thought - on my '96 Ram van, the flexible inner fenderwell 'splash shields' (for lack of a better term) are either missing (DS) or nearly destroyed (PS).

(BTW, these are the flexible, black hanging partitions, without which you can see your engine block in the fenderwell above the front tires.)

I checked with Mopar a while ago, they wanted, gulp,
$ 118 each !!

Does anyone think that they are crucial to have ? Functionally speaking, I mean.

So, I guess I'm asking if:

A) How many of you are missing them as I am ?

B) Do you think it's a big deal ?

D) Creative ideas to make some - seems it could be done I'm just not sure what the best approach would be...

The parts man at our local Dodge dealer claimed his system only showed like dozen in the whole country - he claimed that when parts are that low, the prices rise.....interesting....

Thanks for any input,

David B.
 

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Seating for 12
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1,893 Posts
Dave,

Well, it looks like you're going to make them yourself. lol

Get a few 2mm or 1/4" sheets of black polypropylene and a plastic welding tip for your hot hand-held solder gun. Cut the sheets into the shape you need and then cut 1~2mm filler strips with a dry-wall cutter or box cutter tool. The PP material will bond back to iteslf. You can also do this with CPVC glue, but that can get messy.

The hot hand-held solder gun and plastic welding tip (looks like a flat mushroom head upside-down) can really make the PP into a nice shape. The tool is great for plastic shaping indeed.

Most inner wheel well covers, front lower grill sheilds and rear under body covers are made of PP (polypropylene).

I once had to make repairs to my old, but dead now, Ford Escort's wheel wells. This was the cheap and easy fix to do with limited cash back then.
 

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RamVanMan
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594 Posts
Discussion Starter #3
back to you Stev....

Stev,

How are you, brother ! ? Good to hear from you - I appreciate your suggestion - creative !

So you suggest then using the existing one on the Passernger side as a template ?

Great idea, but I lack the drivers' side - maybe it's a mirror opposite, probably not.

Ok I think I have a 'weller solder gun' or a propane one, too. If I don't have that attachement, I'll find one - I have seen them but didn't know its function 'til you described it !

Where do I try to find this thick, flexible PP sheeting ? I do have some 6 mil back landscape pastic, but I think you mean something MUCH heavier, right ?

Best Regards, David


PS: do you think there is any tangible negative or positive to these items ?

stev said:
Dave,

Well, it looks like you're going to make them yourself. lol

Get a few 2mm or 1/4" sheets of black polypropylene and a plastic welding tip for your hot hand-held solder gun. Cut the sheets into the shape you need and then cut 1~2mm filler strips with a dry-wall cutter or box cutter tool. The PP material will bond back to iteslf. You can also do this with CPVC glue, but that can get messy.

The hot hand-held solder gun and plastic welding tip (looks like a flat mushroom head upside-down) can really make the PP into a nice shape. The tool is great for plastic shaping indeed.

Most inner wheel well covers, front lower grill sheilds and rear under body covers are made of PP (polypropylene).

I once had to make repairs to my old, but dead now, Ford Escort's wheel wells. This was the cheap and easy fix to do with limited cash back then.
 

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Do It In A Van
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8,045 Posts
I don't have them on my '94 or my '85. However, there's a '97 here at the local pick n pull that has them.
 

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Seating for 12
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1,893 Posts
>PP< Polypropylene sheet

-Lightweight
-Excellent electrical properties
-Working temperatures and tensile strength are superior to low or high density polyethylene
-Good abrasion resistance
-USDA/FDA approved
-Impact resistant
-Machinable
-Weldable
-Formable
-Low moisture absorption rate
-Stain resistant

Generic name is also POLYPRO Sheet.

the sheets come in various thickness. The most common is 1/8" and 1/4" in 12"x24". sheets. Check out Lowes or Home Depot. Make sure it's flat sheets and not corrugated. lol

If you have a 100 watt Weller soldering gun and strips of plastic of polypropylene, then you can weld larger pieces together.

If you have a basic hand solder wand, then a plastic welding tip is ideal too.

If you had these things in the this kit, that can be adapted to the Weller tool, you're all set to go. Just remember, the longer you apply the heat, the faster the material turns to butter. It takes a few practice trys, but easy to do. Practice on a few old plastic milk jugs first. ;) http://www.malcom.com/products/pwk.php

Here's a photo of someone doing this. Notice the plastic rod material. This is for a hot air gun. BUT, and I repeat, BUT, all you need to do is soften the joint of the mating parts or shapes with the Weller tip, lay in place the plastic rod strip, and then smooth the rod strip in place with the Weller tip. It's actually simpler than it looks. :)



So basically, what I'm trying to mention is plastic welding with a Weller doing Tack welding. You can butt two shapes together, lock them in place and tack weld between the two. Next, take a strip of your hand cut filler rod/strip material and then soften that in place of the tack weld ditch.



This is an easy homeschool project we have used a few times to make display boards and other plastic hardware to modify.

PP can be easily painted too. But you first need to sand or rough up the smooth surface first.

Peace!

Stev
 
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