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Discussion Starter #1
Just ordered a cold air intake from e-bay. What kind of gains will I realisticly see with me 1998 ram 1500 sport with a 5.2? I am hoping it helps with some low end power. The truck is a real dog till about 2500 rpm. It wont even churp the tires from a stop. I am also curiouse about the resitor mod to the air intake sensor. A friend of mine has a 97 chevy and has gotten good results with the mod. Any one know what resistor to use? Last question, any one know where to get a good but inexpensive replacement cat as mine may be going bad? Thanks for any input :)
 

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I got the cold air intake from e-bay last night. The bolt they supplied to install the top hat didn't have enough threads on it. I just made my own. It sure is a tight fit. I also made a bracket to go from the shock tower to the intake tube instead of using the one that bolts to the exhaust. My exhaust bolts are all corroded and I am sure will break if a socket ever has to be put on them. we will see if the cold air intake helps with performance.
 

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Illinois Boy
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I took the chance and took my nut off on my manifold, I did and it was fine. The CAI wont make you chirp your tires more. Althought I did go from 10mpg to 12.9mpg, Dunno if that had 100% to do with the cai i installed
 

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I haven't noticed any performance gains or fuel mileage improvements. My truck won't even think of chirping it's tires. Have to dig deeper for some gains I guess.
 

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Illinois Boy
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I bet a set of 1.7 rollers, CAI and full exhaust might get you a chirp. M1 intake and ud pullies should def give you a squeel
 

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what would a set of 1.7 rollers do? I also herd that a m1 intake is not as good when your towing or looking for low end.
 

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Illinois Boy
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roller rockers will give you more hp due to less friction in the valve train. I forget if they get you mpg, Im sure it might somewhat. I think 7-15 they claim on those.

When I did a search on the M1 intake, I found that the low end myth is in fact a myth. If I remember, the stock intake DID beat the m1 in hp or tq in one rpm range, but the the M1 took back over and smashed it. Nothing youd really notice anyway.
 

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I did a mpg check over the weekend. Looks like about 17.2 mpg, wich is goof enough for me especialy if I can get a little more power out of the old Dodge. Anyone know of a good after market cat or a good universal one?
 

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Paulr161, I think the magnaflow high flow cat is what you want. They make direct fit replacments and universal.
 

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Illinois Boy
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17mpg wow.. Yes the magnaflow has a dual in single out like the factory. Or you could spend some cash and get an entire exhaust system and get more hp and more mpg!
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Thanks everone for all your input. where is a good place to get a cat? Has anyone relocated their AIT or done the resister mod?
 

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An Army of One
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Check this out, i have been running this for over 5 years and best mod yet.
http://perform.kmd-innovations.com

i got my cat on ebay, magnaflow hi flow for like $86 to the door.
 

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An Army of One
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It makes the computer think that colder air is coming in, so it adjusts the air/fuel mixture and timing to creat a more complete combustion, so more power!
 

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Don't blame the eBay cold air intake for not giving you a MPG increase.

There has been lots of careful scientific testing of all kinds of air intakes and the result is that they neither increase/decrease MPG on gasoline engines.

If less restrictive air inlet system improved MPG,
after the last 20 yrs of C.A.F.E. government standards,
you would now see massive air intakes with 3 foot high by 6 foot wide openings - even on the smallest 4 cyl compact.

Honda told its student engineers to do everything possible on the Insight Hybrid to get the greatest possible MPG (they were in a competition with Porsche's grandson Ferdinand Piech who as Audi CEO was building the A3 aluminum body/3 cyl diesel as the world's highest MPG car) Honda used every known trick in the gasoline engineering book to get over 70 MPG to beat Audi's 3 liters per 100 km fuel economy on diesel.

Go look at the air intake of a Honda Insight. What do you see?

A properly designed air intake can give modest increases of torque and horsepower at wide open throttle - but sometimes this comes at the cost of increased noise or filters that get clogged with bugs and dirt faster.

More thoughts on air filters from another post:
------------------------
If you want a quick answer skip to the end of this message where it says 'Well in a nutshell'.

But if you want a real answer you can trust, then.......

Go down to Sears and buy one of the $30-70 multimeters with the temperature
probe. Sometimes they are on sale for $19

http://www.sears.com/sr/javasr/prod...0&bidsite=CRAFT



Then buy one of these $30 gauges that can measure low pressures and buy a
length of plastic tubing about 10 feet long to attach to it:

http://flw.com/olash2.htm#1490



Get the 30/30" pressure model.

If you don't want to spend this money you can also make a simple "U tube
manometer" with just a 20 foot length of clear plastic tubing. do a Google
search.

Now drill small holes in your stock air filter housing and air inlet tubing,
like at:

1. at the begining of the inlet tube
2. in front of the air filter element
3. behind the air filter element
4. near the throttle body connection

Put a fresh new air filter element in your stock filter box. Go out on a road
with little traffic and measure the temperature and pressures at your small
hole test points of the stock system when the engine is at wide open throttle
through the 2000 to 6000 rpm range.

If you find between two points that the temperature goes up, then the air is
picking up heat in that length between the two points. (i predict you won't
find much heat pickup)

If you find that the pressures go down between two points then there is
restriction in that section, like across the filter element ( i predict you
will only find a small restriction across the paper element of the filter)

Now try moving the air inlet to the stock filter box from its stock location
to other places - like the grille top or bottom. Look for a place where the
pressure is highest and the temperature is lowest. (I predict you will find
that the cavity behind the firewall and below the windshield will be best -
this is also where your air vents pick up air to ventilate the truck's cabin)

Now, if you are a bit more adventurous try the following experiment:

With all the stock air system in place, put the truck in 2nd gear and measure
with a stop watch how many seconds it takes to accelerate from 3000 rpm to
6000 rpm with wide open throttle. Do this test 3 times and average the
result.

Now if you are a little more daring and have found a clean road with little
dust in the air, think about doing the following 2 tests (it is optional but
informative)

Do the same test from 3000 to 6000 rpm, but with the paper air filter removed
from the box, and the box closed back up. This is the 'no filter but cool air
pickup' test.

Then do the same test, but with the air intake system removed and the throttle
body opening sucking the hot air from underneath the hood. This is the 'no
filter hot air pickup test.'

{The above tests sound dangerous without an air filter, but I can tell you
that many highway patrol officers removed the air filters on their cars in the
1970s. I have personally seen people pour uncooked rice down carburetors to
scour out carbon deposits. Lack of an air filter over long periods will cause
the bore walls and piston rings to wear out much quicker, but a quick test has
little effect unless you are unlucky enough to get a large chunk of something
down the throttle. If you are worried you can cover the throttle opening with
some eighth inch hole window screen material}

Now go order the aftermarket air inlet systems of your choice and repeat the
pressure, temperature and 3000-6000 rpm acceleration tests in 2nd gear. Send
back the systems that don't do as well as the best for a refund of your money.

Report your results to Dodge truck forums.
You will be a hero to some,
the worst possible news to others selling junk.

Don't want to do all this testing?

Well, in a nutshell just remount your stock air box so that it will suck air
out of the cavity behind the firewall and below the windshield where your air
vents presently get their air. This spot will give you cooler air, higher
pressure air, and it will not pickup bugs/road grit as badly as an inlet near
the front grill.

Why didn't Dodge suck air from this spot in the first place?

Because with the air vent inlets there it allows A LOT of NOISE to go into the
truck's cabin.

As a matter of fact, most aftermarket air intakes JUST MAKE EXTRA NOISE. This
extra noise convinces most owners that they are making more horsepower - no
kidding.

Notice that I have not said to do dyno testing on your air intakes...I have
said do road tests.

Why?

Because you can't really test an aftermarket air intake system on a dyno where
the vehicle is not moving and an electric fan is blowing air at the radiator.
This makes it SO EASY TO CHEAT that you can make any air intake show a HP
increase on the dyno graph. Don't trust any dyno graph that claims to show an
aftermarket air intake horsepower gain. Realistic airflow around the vehicle
is critical to seeing whether it really works.
 
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