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So whats UR excuse?
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There are a few things to consider when buying new wheels and tires for your sport compact or any vehicle for that matter.

The first thing you need to do is ask yourself a few questions.

1. What do you expect to do with the tires.
2. What is the weather like where you live.
3. How long do you want the tires to last.

There are alot less selections of quality street tires than that of cool wheels!!
The question often asked is what are the best tires.. There really isnt a single answer to this question. The tires you choose should be based on what type of driving you want to do. Usually,you get what you pay for. But if you buy expensive tires expecting that they will be good for both street and occasional track use,you will be disappointed. Tires come in different compounds. In general a softer compound will offer better handling,but will wear out sooner than a harder tire. A raceing tire may handle well on dy pavement,but it will suffer in the rain, and vise versa.

The first thing you need to do before you choose a street tire is to decide what type of driving you are going to do. If you don't plan on doing any racing, then a harder compound will do nicely. Traction in the rain and snow will not be compromised as long as you stick with good name brands. If you care more about handling than tire wear,select a softer compound tire. But be carefull when useing a softer compound on a daily driver. Dry performance will be superior but under any other condition, you could be putting yourself at risk. SOOO in other words if you live in Arizona, go for it. But if you live in a place where snow and rain are a common thing to deal with you would be better off with a more conservative tire.

Tire sizes.

Tire sizes can be confusing. For example, both a 225/50/15 and a 205/50/15 will fit your 15x7 wheel. Your first impression may be to go for the 50 series tire,since you think it has a smaller overall dia. That however would be wrong!
These two tires have the same dia! The first number in the tire size is the width in mm. The second # "50" is a percentage of the width vs. the height of the side wall.(distance that the tire extends above the rim). In other words, a given "series" indicator (which is a percentage) is not a constant.
In this case, the height of the 225/50/15 is the first # (225 mm wide) multiplied by the series #. (50%) equals 112.5 mm in height. For the narrower tire, the 205/50/15, the height is 205 mm x 50%= 102.5 mm tall. Therefore, the 225/50/15 has a side wall that is 10mm taller than that of the 205/50/15.

In order to calculate the overall Dia. of your wheel and tire combo, you need to convert inches (wheel size) to mm. One inch equals 25.4 mm, buit don't get out the calculator yet. Lets say you and your freind have identical neons.
He has 15 inch wheels mounted with a set of 205/50/15's. But you want to go more radical than him and get a 17 inch wheel.

Lets do the math. The distance from the center of the 15 inch wheel to the outer edge of the rim (radius) is only 7.5 inches. The wheels you want to get are two inches larger than his, but only one inch will stick up into your fender well (8.5 vs. 7.5 inches above the center of the wheel). The other inch will be lifting your car off the ground 8.5 vs. 7.5 inches below the center of the wheel).

In order to retain the same look you will need a 17 inch tire with the same overall Dia., so what tire size do you need? The average 205/50/15 has an overall Dia. of 23.2 inches, while the 205/50/17 is nearly the same size at 23.5 inches. Some tires sit lower int he wheel than others. (like Michelin Pilots). Also remember, if you buy a wider wheel, the tire will usually seat lower than with a narrower rim. Tires wider than 225 mm will not fit under a Neon without mods to the fenderwells.

This is my first post within this thread, there is much more that I have to jot down for tires and wheels, but I am short on time today! Bear with me here fellas.There is more to come.
 

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ACR,

Awesome post! Thanks!
 

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So whats UR excuse?
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Discussion Starter #3
Part two

Stock neon wheels are 14x5.5-inch. The bolt pattern 5 x 100-mm with a 40-mm offset. ACR and R/T wheels are 14x6-inches. Sorry I don't have the specs on 2nd gens wheels yet. YET

Regardless of what other people might say the most popular wheels for performance (not looks) is 14x7 and 15x7 inches.

Larger wheels have their up's and downs. For instance if you go with a bigger wheel and tire combo, your tires may last longer. BUT you will be putting more stress on your transmission. It's much easier to turn a small wheel than a large one. This is why people feel a reduction in torque also. Another good thing (if you live in snow) is the extra inch or so you gain in ground clearance. (also good for skimming roadkill) LOL.
I for one notice that my 14's are allot more lively than the 16's IN any gear! The 16's take longer to gain speed and longer to stop. On the 14's your rpm's will stay slightly higher exiting a turn than on 16's. So the larger tire kills you twice there! It robs you of torque that you need to pull out of the turn hard and also keeps your rpm's lower to begin with. This is not desirable on a performance car.

A few reasons why 15 inch tires are the most popular on Neons is because they add only the minimum amount of increased size, and they have a heck of allot larger selection of performance sizes. It's hard to find a good performance tire in a 14 inch wheel. Another good thing about smaller Dia wheels is the price diff than that of a larger dia. .

Thats a few things I thought would be useful to some people who are looking into getting new wheels. Enjoy....................
 

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HoodooGuru
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Man u must have had some spare time or were VERY bored! lol
 

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So whats UR excuse?
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Discussion Starter #7
Tire Pressures!

One of the cheapest things to do that increse handling is to experiment with your tire pressure.

For instance if you find your car pushing in the turns you could correct some if not all of this by raising the front tire pressure. You can also lower the rear pressure. OR both! When you adjust your pressures, start out higher and work your way down. Each time you make a test run check to see how much of the tire is rolling over. If it rolls over past the tread your pressure is too low.

Running street tires with 40-45 in the front and 30-35 in the rear will make the rear end loose. This is a good set up for drifting. The lower the pressure the LESS traction you will get. However, If you are running Drag slicks the opposite is true. They are designed to need the flex in order to grab traction.


The best advise I can give is for you to test it out and see what works for you. I tend to like more pressure in the fronts than in the rear. It is what best suits me in my car on racing suspension. 30-35 fronts and 28-32 in the rear. If you have a heavier car, you should increase these pressures.

UMMMMM! Did I miss anything? LOL
 

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dodgeneonACR98 said:
UMMMMM! Did I miss anything? LOL
All 1st Gen alloy wheels were 14" X 6", not just the ones on the R/T or ACR. (yes, I know they are the same wheels, they put the alloys on sports as well however).

Dont forget the early base model neons were 4 lug. Bolt pattern was 4 X 100mm.

Softer rubber will almost always have more grip than harder rubber in almost all circumstances. Wet weather performance has more to do with dread design (ability to resist hydroplaning) than does the compound. Tires made for wet and dry traction have more sipes in the tread, whereas a tire made for supperior dry performance only will have less sipes, thus hydroplaining easier on wet roads. Another important aspect to tire grip is the temp range that the tire is made to operate in. Summer tires are usually made with rubber compounds designed to stick best in hot weather, 50-60 degrees F and up. All season tires are made from rubber compound designed to operate in a broader temperature range, but usually sacrifice grip because of that. Winter tires are the only tires with a rubbercompound designed to still function in sub-zero temperatures, which is why they actually have traction in the winter, but they dont grip well in hotter temperatures because of it. (if you notice, winter tires are made of extremely soft rubber, you DONT want a hard rubber for snow perfomance).

And tires wider than 205mm will rub on the back of a 1st Gen neon, unless wheel spacers are used (dangerous without longer wheel studs), or you buy wheels with a radical offset (so they stick out past the quarter panel.... yeah, ghetto), or you buy different suspension arms.... I dont know what they're called, but you can buy them so they bend inward, allowing you to run a wider tire on the back. 7" wide is also the widest wheel you can fit on the back.

Just browsing through what you wrote ACR98, giving my 2 cents.
 

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So whats UR excuse?
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Discussion Starter #9
Your two cent is welcome Bro! I did leave it open when I asked if I forgot something.

Most of the Info I took from the High-Performance Neon builders hand book.So I blame any mistakes on them LMAO....JK And you are exactly right about the tread patterns.
And the temp ranges of each compound. See I knew I left something out! LMAO Later
 

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ACR,

Any differences with 2nd gen neons? Don't leave us hangin' man!
 

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2nd Gen wheels: Bigger and heavier than 1st Gen wheels. :D
 

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HoodooGuru
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2nd gens neons = the sexy neons!
 

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HoodooGuru said:
2nd gens neons = the sexy neons!

LOL, that's right Hoodoo, we all know envy when we see it! :)
 

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Do you 2nd Gen owners have obnoxious dash rattles? If you dont, then I envy you for that... the NVH in my car since the motor mount inserts is annoying the heck out of me! Oh well, they were still worth it. :rck:
 

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The best way to handle those obnoxious dash rattles is to install a louder sound system! :D
 

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ok i know its been posted before but what offset do i need for some 18 wheels? The ones im looking at have a 45mm offset is this a problem or will it work and also whats the size of tire on the 2nd gen 15 wheels?
 

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Should say on the side of your tire.
It should be 185 60 15. 2nd gen.
 

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reading tires

all that info is good stuf, no doubt. but, other than size, what are u buyin'? all tires (DOT) have ratings in 3 categories; 1, TRACTION (AA A B C) - this rates WET road performance. my Hoosier drag radials are rated C (overrated at C i believe, theyre not that good in the rain, lol). the Potenzas on the rear are rated A. 2, TEMP (A B C) - ability to dissapate heat. fronts/rears both A. 3, TREADWARE (3 didget #) - this is the one to take note of. rule of thumb; 100 times the treadware # is howmany miles the tire will last under ''normal'' conditions. the lower the #, the softer/stickier the tire. my Hoosiers are rated 040 (it'll be gone with 4000 highway miles). the Bridgestones are rated 360 (they have a 40,000 mile warrantee). theyre wagon wheels compared to the Hoosiers. LOL. btw. the Falken Azenis tires i was using were rated B A 110. they accually drove pretty good in the rain. hope this info will be used by someone out there............later
 

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dodgeneonACR98 said:
For instance if you find your car pushing in the turns you could correct some if not all of this by raising the front tire pressure. You can also lower the rear pressure. OR both! When you adjust your pressures, start out higher and work your way down. Each time you make a test run check to see how much of the tire is rolling over. If it rolls over past the tread your pressure is too low.

Running street tires with 40-45 in the front and 30-35 in the rear will make the rear end loose. This is a good set up for drifting. The lower the pressure the LESS traction you will get. However, If you are running Drag slicks the opposite is true. They are designed to need the flex in order to grab traction.


The best advise I can give is for you to test it out and see what works for you. I tend to like more pressure in the fronts than in the rear. It is what best suits me in my car on racing suspension. 30-35 fronts and 28-32 in the rear. If you have a heavier car, you should increase these pressures.

UMMMMM! Did I miss anything? LOL
If your car is already pushing, I don't see how raising the front tire pressures will solve the problem. Taking pressure out of the front (assuming you are not already rolloing on the sidewalls) will help your understeer. Best thing to do would be to take air out of the rear, or put more air in the rear.

There are two ways to get the rearend of the car to rotate with air pressure. You can either underinflate your rear tires which will cause the side walls to flex and possibly roll which reduces traction in the rear and rotates the rear.

The other option is to overinflate your rear tires.

It's a matter of personal preference. I used to run about 48 psi in the rear to get the rear end to rotate. I have since switched, and run anywhere between 26 and 33 in the rear and about 37-38 in the front.

This is for autocross purposes only of course. Normal street driving I keep all 4 around 33.
 
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