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Does anyone know if a 98 Stratus has a blower motor relay and where it might be located? The motor was working on high only and now nothing.The fuses are good but im not getting any power to the resistor or motor.Even tried a different control head and still nothing. Thanks
 

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I'm having a similar problem with our 2004 Stratus. First the heater/AC blower would only work on high, this week it won't operate at all. Is this as simple as replacing the dash switch or is there a bigger problem I should be looking for. My first thought was to just order a new dash switch and hope that takes care of it, but that may be spending money in the wrong place. My dealer wants to charge me an $80 diagnostic fee just to look at it.

I've noticed many others have experienced the same/similar problem(s) with their Stratus regardless of age. Of course none of this happened while it was still under warranty. We have 45K miles on it so we're beyond the 3/36.

Any suggestions? Thanks in advance.
 

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Yard parts

Check your local salvage/junk yard first. The best ones let you get the parts yourself, this way you can see Stratus in many states of undo before you tear into your rig.

The Chilton's repair manual will help you trace the wires, fuse links and find the relay (the relay is under hood I think).

Good luck,
EZ
 

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I took a chance and purchased a new relay for the blower switch/motor ($43 at the local Mopar parts counter) and replaced it. Problem solved. The new relay/resistor is an updated design that is supposedly more reliable. We'll see.

On my 2004 Stratus SXT 4-door the relay assembly is located under the dash on the passenger's side. You have to be a contortionist to actually get a good view of it. Look for the rectangular connecting block with four wires from the fan switch that connect to the relay/resistor module mounted in the heater/AC duct work. Most of the module can't be seen as it sticks up inside the duct work to use the air flow to cool it. All you can see is the connector block that the 4-wire harness plugs into.

CAUTION: The way the lock mechanism on the connector block is designed to prevent the electrical connection from coming loose makes it impossible to seperate the wiring harness from the relay/resistor module. I almost broke them trying to seperate the two while upside down under the dash with obstructed visibility. (I think I'm getting too old and fat for this crap!) Instead, remove the two hex screws that hold the module and remove the entire assembly from the duct work with the wires still connected. Once you can pull it down where you can see it you'll find a slide lock on the connector block that releases the wiring harness from the module. Trying to release the slide lock while the module it still attached to the duct work is impossible because it's on the back side out of view and in a tight space.

The next issue that I ran into was that the printed circuit board on the new module that is suppose to slide up into slot in the duct work was thicker than the old module and wouldn't fit through the slot. The circuit board looked like it was dipped into some kind of insulating material/heat-sink probably to help dissipate heat faster to improve the life of the module. I had to take a razor knife and trim the plastic and enlarge the opening to make it accept the new module. Plugged the wiring harness back in and SUCCESS! It works fine now.

One thing the guy at the parts counter was concerned about when I purchased the module is that the initial symptoms leading up to the module failure initially started as the heater/AC fan just working on HIGH indicating a completely open circuit because the resistor failed. Mine then progressed to the fan not working at all. He said that usually means the fan motor has burned out from running on HIGH all the time. His comments made sense because the failed resistor results in a completely open circuit, not a closed one. He also said that if the fan motor was drawing too much power it may have caused the relay/resistor module to fail and would likely cause the new one to fail as well, thus wasting $43. He said I might be back for a new module AND a new fan motor.

So, beware. Don't let someone talk you into buying a fan motor (a surprisingly low $86 at the Mopar parts counter) until you replace the relay/resistor module first. Besides, replacing the motor looks even more complicated from what I could see.

Sorry I didn't think to take pictures of this process.
 
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