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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I have had my original battery for 7.5 years and 116K miles, so I decided to replace it and not risk it going bad this winter.

I went to my local Costco (great batteries for the money in my opinion), looked up my battery to replace it said group 65 750 cold cranking amps. Problem is the only battery in my size was 850 cold cranking amps. My question is can I use and 850 in place of a 750?

All opinions welcomed.

Thank you!
 

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Absolutely!. You can go up in cold cranking amps, but dont go down from what the manufacturer put in it. You will be just fine, maybe even better off.
 

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2005 Hemi Ram
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Yes u can. It wont hurt anything. The more cranking amps means the easier the truck will start.
 

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:thatfunny:thatfunny:thatfunny

What they said. The more CCA the better.

I still have the OEM battery in my '06 (manufactured 11/2005) so it's 6 years old and most replacement batteries I've checked are 850 CCA.
 

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Absolutely!. You can go up in cold cranking amps, but dont go down from what the manufacturer put in it. You will be just fine, maybe even better off.
Thank you!!!!:rck:
 

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Yes u can. It wont hurt anything. The more cranking amps means the easier the truck will start.
Thank you!!! I am good to go now, I am installing the 850 CCA.
 

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:thatfunny:thatfunny:thatfunny

What they said. The more CCA the better.

I still have the OEM battery in my '06 (manufactured 11/2005) so it's 6 years old and most replacement batteries I've checked are 850 CCA.
Thanks for sharing and your input. My 04 OEM battery still test well, but I didn't want to risk an 8th winter on the original battery in New England.
 

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:thatfunny:thatfunny:thatfunny

What they said. The more CCA the better.

I still have the OEM battery in my '06 (manufactured 11/2005) so it's 6 years old and most replacement batteries I've checked are 850 CCA.
That's amazing. My '03 still has the OEM battery as well (build date July 2, 2003).
 

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Kenneth Robert
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Good call on replacing it before it died. I replaced the one on my 02 last year after 8 years of service before it died. I went up to 850 CCA as well.
 

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Cold Cranking Amps is the amount of amps (power) that a battery can provide for 30 seconds at 0 degrees F before the voltage falls to unusable levels.

Like everyone says...the more the better. A 650 CCA battery will work but it will provide less reserve power than a 750 CCA unit will during a cold winter morning to start your ride.

A healthy, fully charged battery will provide only about 65% of its power at 32 degrees F compared to 100% at about 80 degrees F. That's why most batteries "die" in the winter. They can also fail because of the summer heat which causes above average internal resistance.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
Cold Cranking Amps is the amount of amps (power) that a battery can provide for 30 seconds at 0 degrees F before the voltage falls to unusable levels.

Like everyone says...the more the better. A 650 CCA battery will work but it will provide less reserve power than a 750 CCA unit will during a cold winter morning to start your ride.

A healthy, fully charged battery will provide only about 65% of its power at 32 degrees F compared to 100% at about 80 degrees F. That's why most batteries "die" in the winter. They can also fail because of the summer heat which causes above average internal resistance.
Excellent explanation :rck:

Considering I live in Vermont in the winter, the more CCA the better for sure!
 
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