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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can anyone confirm the brake bleeding order on my 2012 Grand Caravan? I don't have a service manual and I can't get a conclusive answer via google so any help is appreciated. Replaced my rear calipers, one side had overheated and melted the boot, seemed to be very sticky. I've had accelerated pad wear in the rear on this vehicle from the get go. $50 a piece figured I'd do both sides while I was at it. Thanks.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yes Always in this order, left rear , right rear, right front, left front.
Specifically for the 2012? I ask because I can find nothing conclusive anywhere. Other threads indicate that the '06 service manual specifies Left Rear Wheel, Right Front Wheel, Right Rear Wheel, Left Front Wheel... I can't find a manual for the '12. Thanks.
 

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May I make a correction here , it should be in this order right rear, left rear, right front, left front. you may or may not find the bleed order in a manual. However you always bleed the brake cylinder or caliper the furthest from the master cylinder and work your way to the shortest.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
May I make a correction here , it should be in this order right rear, left rear, right front, left front. you may or may not find the bleed order in a manual. However you always bleed the brake cylinder or caliper the furthest from the master cylinder and work your way to the shortest.
I read that often, but just snagged a Haynes (couldn't find chrysler shop manual) and it states the same order as the previous generation, L Rear, R Front, R Rear, Left Front

http://i.imgur.com/YNDJYMK.jpg?1
 

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Well I see that , however, technically through all colleges that teach automotive the order will be from the brake furthest away from the master cylinder to the shortest to bleed all air out of the line furthest away I work on all types daily and that is the process used.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Well I see that , however, technically through all colleges that teach automotive the order will be from the brake furthest away from the master cylinder to the shortest to bleed all air out of the line furthest away I work on all types daily and that is the process used.
Fair enough, likely either order will do the job, and if it doesn't just have to bleed them a second time. For this run I'll go with what the haynes manual specifies.
 

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Especially when from master cylinder you have 2 distinct brake hoses coming out - one or front wheels and one or rear wheels (splitting in 2 rear wheels and separate 2 front wheels in the ABS module) ......it would make sense to do them separately and not criss/cross
 

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i wonder about what's the reasoning for Chrysler /Dodge to recommend an "X" type bleeding instead of the more common sensical furthest - to closest brake caliper order ??
Because they now configure the hydraulic circuits to try and ensure that you always have at least one front wheel and one rear wheel braking in the event of a hydraulic failure. It's called a diagonal split system. With front wheel drive systems, the braking proportions have changed compared to much older times. Many years ago when the split in hydraulics was more commonly front & rear, the braking was more around a 60/40 or 70/30 percent split front to rear. Front wheel drive vehicles have so much more moving mass over the front wheels, so the split commonly moves closer to 90/10 percent front to rear. It's planning against highly improbable, but not impossible situations. If you somehow managed to lose both front brakes, that last 10% in the rear isn't worth much.

So RR, LR, RF, LF is not the way to bleed brake systems anymore. In older cars where the split was front to rear, the pattern was just a common sense thing for the time. You bleed the hydraulic circuit farthest away untill all air is purged, and then move on to the next circuit that was the next farthest away.

Even for the newer X pattern, I never really stuck to what the manual required unless I had a catastrophic failure to repair. When you're only repairing one faulty circuit at a time, bleeding that one circuit is enough from a functional standpoint. If the repair is done in a timely fashion, the other three circuits will remain unaffected. I see this is a really old thread, but I'll use the OP's van as a reference. If he chose to pull both calipers off at the same time, the X pattern is fairly moot because the LR and RR each have hydraulic circuits that aren't connected to each other. All you really need to do is stick to the part of the old rule that tells you to bleed the longest hydraulic lines first. Then bleeding the fronts is just maintenance at that point. There's a very high probability that air will never get past any one failed hydraulic circuit to affect the others. I'd suspect it would take negligence to change that probability.
 
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Excellent reply. I wasn't aware of this new x-type brake line connection by dodge. And since nobody gives any damn information or advice if you ask a dealer , and you can't ask Dodge directly, my guess is that a lot of " cheap" home DIY-ers would do it by mistake the traditional way. ( back then front). - i would...😢😢😢😢
It wouldn't hurt Dodge to slap a damn sticker !!! " This vehicle has a new cross wheel - X -braking system " on the master cylinder or the vacuum booster 😀😀😀 . Even from a " advertising" , sales point will help. " Safety"😀😀😀
I only started looking into this because i was seing conflicting videos on YouTube on the subject. Some were still recommending the traditional way. One ( british guy) was insistent on the X-type, but didn't explain why, like you did, Great thanks for that.
And I hate when people say " do that because i said so" and don't provide logical reason for the action.
I am changing all 4 calipers and all brake fluid flush and some brake lines so i damn sure let air in the system. That's why it's important to bleed it out right. ( 2014 Grand Caravan)
Now I understand.
Left Rear > Right Front
Right Rear > Left Front
Thank you!!!😀😀😀
 
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