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Discussion Starter #1
Does the 1992 3.3L engine have steel inserts for the spark plugs. Or are the threads part of the aluminum head.
 

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aluminum heads. if you have a striped one, and this is just a wild guess, but it wouldn't happen to be the one right next to the altenator, is it? Thread repair inserts are available at napa.
 

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This is just a general question. I recently learned that all 3.3L heads are aluminum, and i was wondering if they come with factory inserts for the spark plugs so the holes do not strip out.
 

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Threads are part of the aluminum. Never-seize on them is suggested. Always make sure they screw in by hand first. A hose on the tip of the spark plug makes it easy. Once it's started, pull the hose then use the spark plug socket.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
“Threads are part of the aluminum. Never-seize on them is suggested.”

From time to time i think about the condition of my spark plug holes. In the past you asked me to do a compression test. I was actually afraid to do so.

Over the summer i put double platinum plugs in because they are so hard to change and these are very long lasting. At that time i did not know that the 3.3L heads were all aluminum. As i was taking the plugs out, i noticed that the last guy that put the plugs in did not even fully seat them. They came out rough and squeaky. As i was slowly taking them out i was thinking i am glad i have cast iron heads, an aluminum head would be stripped out by now. I used anti-seize on the new plugs and carefully put them in. They went in a little tight but not as bad as coming out. I assumed that some carbon had worked its way in to the threads from the cylinders. Later i read that my heads were aluminum, in the back of my mind i have been worried about the threads being tore up ever since. Had i known they were aluminum i would have sprayed each spark plug with PB blaster after the first turn, and then cleaned up the threads with a tap.

I know that the new plugs did seat OK but now i am worried about the condition of the threads.
 

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If they weren't coated in the threads with aluminum they should be fine. Most likely he didn't use never-seize and would explain why they were so hard coming out.
If the way your picture shows, is how all the spark plugs look, their good to go.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
"If the way your picture shows, is how all the spark plugs look, their good to go."

Yes all plugs looked like that. And thanks i feel better now.

BTW, do you have any reason to use never-seize over anti-seize.
 

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ANTI SEIZE
Particularly effective on stainless steel bolts and nuts which have a high likelihood of seizure.

A highly refined blend of aluminum, copper and graphite lubricants. Use during assembly to prevent galling, corrosion and seizing and to assure easier disassembly. Protects metal parts against rust, corrosion, and seizure.

Temperature range: -60°F to 1600°F (-51°Cto 871°C). Salt, corrosion and moisture resistant – ideal for marine use. Non-aerosol version meets Mil Spec #907E. Aerosol - Level 3*

Never-Seez

Protects metal parts against rust, corrosion, and seizure.

Particularly effective on stainless steel bolts and nuts which have a high likelihood of siezure
Cost wise Never-Seez is a couple $ more.

http://www.meyerplastics.com/adhesives_seal_tape/anti-seize_comp_sht.htm
 
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