DodgeTalk Forum banner
Status
Not open for further replies.
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
see many using the 180 thermostat, why?? will it screw up emissions?? will it help performance or fuel economy??
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,733 Posts
No advantage in my testing to pinging reduction, power increase, or fuel economy with a 180. Kenne Bell company dyno tests show same.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
thanks hank, thats as i thought
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,902 Posts
The 180 thermostat will keep the engine cooler - at 180 - versus the 203 for stock. It will not hurt emission nor will it create more horsepower. I haven't noticed a loss/gain in MPG, but I have noticed a better response when the pedal goes to the metal. So for $3 to get a 180 thermostat...its worth the dough!!!
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,902 Posts
So to answer your question, I say do it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
you know what ttu, you are right, $3 and 1/2 hour, I'll give it a shot.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,902 Posts
jhammell said:
you know what ttu, you are right, $3 and 1/2 hour, I'll give it a shot.
Thats the spirit brother! :thatfunny

Let me know if you got any questions. I just posted some pics in my gallery of it for SilsHEMI....he needed a extremely detailed step by step explaination with the pics.....hes a little slow though.... :crazy:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
i'm cool with changing a 'stat, but thanks, not clear on what 20f will do for me but again, worth a shot. thanks
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
just keep in mind that if you live up north were it gets cold it will take your truck a lot longer to warm up. I have a 180 thermostat and see no benefit.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
56 Posts
"20F"??
I am asumming that you mean 20 foot pound radiator cap. The increase from 17 to 20 lbs increases the pressure needed for steam to form in the coolant. Forcing the coolant to stay liquid and continue cooling the engine. The theroy behind the switch is to eliminate the ""RAM PING". Which to my frustration is unavoidable. I have heard "stories" about remanufactured cranks solving the problem. My MPP computer helped but only by advancing the timming to compensate for the bad mill in the crank causing the slight retard of one piston and slight advance of another. The ping went away completely when i changed my heads. I put in R/T's. Did notice alot of casting spurs in the combustion chamber. So is it the crank? the heads? I know it isn't sensors.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
767 Posts
180 is well worth it. Plus, if you ever upgrade the PCM you will already that the 180.
Change the gasket too - $1.00 extra ;-)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,138 Posts
I was just thinking of going with the 180 for summer but you all are saying it doesn't help reduce pinging at all?!? That's NOT what I wanted to hear, now there's no hope to fix it . . .
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,902 Posts
Ram1878 said:
it doesn't help reduce pinging at all?
Stupid Question: What is pinging?
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,902 Posts
RAM MAN said:
I put in the 160 years ago and got a light on for it ... dont go below 180
I was wondering what a 160 would do...I guess its not worth the try. Thanks for the tip!
 

·
Mmmmmmmmm, beer.
Joined
·
2,485 Posts
I hijacked this from another Dodge forum. Not my words:

How can a cooler thermostat increase horsepower? Well its relatively simple if you learn this simple formula. For every 5 degrees you drop your air intake temperature you increase your horsepower by 1 percent. Keep this formula in the back of your mind while I explain this. As everyone surely knows there is coolant circulation through your lower intake on fuel injected engines and the intake on carbureted engines. Normally this coolant has to warm up to a temperature of between 192 and 196 degrees or so before it is allowed to circulate through the radiator where it can dissipate some of the engine heat. So what does this hot coolant do to the intake, well it heats it up of course. The thermostat can only control minimum engine temperature and does not affect maximum temperature so keep this in mind. So in essence it will make the minimum intake temperature on a warmed up engine around 192-196 degrees with some leeway on either side depending on engine and cooling system design. Well lets say we put a 180 degree thermostat in there, well that's 12 to 16 degrees cooler than the stock thermostat. If you could maintain that 180 degrees constantly that could possibly drop you air intake temperature around 12 degrees or so. What does this mean to power output, well on a 200 hp engine that comes out to around 5 horsepower for basically 4 bucks. But in order to take advantage of this your engine must be capable of maintaining this 180 degree, this is normally accomplished through high flow thermostats, auxiliary electric fans, running a high water content in the coolant, etc. But this isn't without its drawbacks. the major drawback is a loss in gas mileage due to the internal combustion engine losing efficiency at lower temperatures and that denser air charges also require more fuel to maintain the proper air fuel ratio. So many people may be asking the question why not run a 160 thermostat. Well my answer to this question is that yes you will probably make a little more power with a 160, but it comes at the cost of terrible gas mileage, increased engine wear due to the lack of part expansion which is calculated in to the engine design to take up certain clearances, increased particulate matter in the oil due to less efficient combustion and much richer mixtures. This is why I don't recommend these in anything besides competition use only engines.
 

·
The Legendary Cross Ram
Joined
·
3,696 Posts
TTURedRaider09 said:
Stupid Question: What is pinging?
Not a stupid question: you "haveta" learn from somewhere, right? Pinging is the metallic noise you hear when the combustion chamber becomes too hot under load.

The result is that around the time the spark plug fires the air/fuel charge, the hot metal or bit of carbon will set off another flame front from the other side of the chamber.

A metallic "pinging" noise is created when the two flamefronts collide.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,902 Posts
Hemi Pete said:
Not a stupid question: you "haveta" learn from somewhere, right? Pinging is the metallic noise you hear when the combustion chamber becomes too hot under load.

The result is that around the time the spark plug fires the air/fuel charge, the hot metal or bit of carbon will set off another flame front from the other side of the chamber.

A metallic "pinging" noise is created when the two flamefronts collide.
Thanks Pete! Now I know.
 

·
The Legendary Cross Ram
Joined
·
3,696 Posts
Silver_DodgeRam said:
I hijacked this from another Dodge forum. Not my words:

How can a cooler thermostat increase horsepower? Well its relatively simple if you learn this simple formula. For every 5 degrees you drop your air intake temperature you increase your horsepower by 1 percent. Keep this formula in the back of your mind while I explain this. As everyone surely knows there is coolant circulation through your lower intake on fuel injected engines and the intake on carbureted engines. Normally this coolant has to warm up to a temperature of between 192 and 196 degrees or so before it is allowed to circulate through the radiator where it can dissipate some of the engine heat. So what does this hot coolant do to the intake, well it heats it up of course. The thermostat can only control minimum engine temperature and does not affect maximum temperature so keep this in mind. So in essence it will make the minimum intake temperature on a warmed up engine around 192-196 degrees with some leeway on either side depending on engine and cooling system design. Well lets say we put a 180 degree thermostat in there, well that's 12 to 16 degrees cooler than the stock thermostat. If you could maintain that 180 degrees constantly that could possibly drop you air intake temperature around 12 degrees or so. What does this mean to power output, well on a 200 hp engine that comes out to around 5 horsepower for basically 4 bucks. But in order to take advantage of this your engine must be capable of maintaining this 180 degree, this is normally accomplished through high flow thermostats, auxiliary electric fans, running a high water content in the coolant, etc. But this isn't without its drawbacks. the major drawback is a loss in gas mileage due to the internal combustion engine losing efficiency at lower temperatures and that denser air charges also require more fuel to maintain the proper air fuel ratio. So many people may be asking the question why not run a 160 thermostat. Well my answer to this question is that yes you will probably make a little more power with a 160, but it comes at the cost of terrible gas mileage, increased engine wear due to the lack of part expansion which is calculated in to the engine design to take up certain clearances, increased particulate matter in the oil due to less efficient combustion and much richer mixtures. This is why I don't recommend these in anything besides competition use only engines.
What Dodge forum is this from?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
75 Posts
Discussion Starter · #20 ·
sorry ram squad, 20= 20 farenhignt (spelling??), as opposed to 20 c (centigrade) I am a water treatment plant operator and we report everything to the state in "c", therefore use "f" when refering to normal liquid measure. unfortunately there is no degree key on a standard us keyboard. i agree increasing the psi on the cap does very little, if not hamper the effect of a lower degree thermostat.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Status
Not open for further replies.
Top