What's the Difference between a "V" and Inline Engine [Archive] - DodgeTalk : Dodge Car Forums, Dodge Truck Forums and Ram Forums

: What's the Difference between a "V" and Inline Engine


JohnMcD348
05-24-2011, 07:45 PM
Yes I know. 1 has the pistons front to back "inline" the other has them in a "V" configuration...

I wanted to know if there's any difference in power/torque between them and if one is better than the other for economy and such. Why does Cummins use the inline engine in the Ram trucks but has other V8 engines they use in others? They've apparently developed the V8 that was probably originally going in the 1500 and are going to be using it in the Nissan Trucks.

I've always heard that the inlines were better for torque/power from idle on up where as the V engines have a shorter torque curve. Is that the same for Diesel engines?

B-300
05-25-2011, 04:22 PM
For the same displacment an inline will have a broader torque curve because 6 cylinders is all they have. (Anymore and the crankshaft will twist.) Because there are fewer cylinders the stroke and/or bore is larger. Ususally the stroke gets the bigger increase and increases torque when compared to the same size V-8.
Also most larger inline 6's are developed for trucks were hood height and engine bay width aren't a problem like in a car so the can use longer rods which broaden the torque curve.

Clunk
05-25-2011, 06:58 PM
The rods on an inline doesn't share a rod journal with another rod on the crankshaft like the V's.
Each rod is also supported by their own pair of main bearings.

Powerwise, a V8 has a power stroke every 90 degrees of crankshaft rotation.
The inline 6 has a power stroke every 120 degrees of crankshaft rotation.

JohnMcD348
05-25-2011, 09:40 PM
So basically, nowadays, the use of a V8 diesel is mainly due more for the engine compartment size than for any real advantage in power/torque. Thinking along the lines of what Clunk said, would the V8 not have the life span that the inline would have?

I think alot about my 92 Bronco and it's engine. I have the Ford 4.9L(300-6). It's a true truck engine. Most people say it's probably one of the best truck engines built that uses gas. 7 main bearings, long bore/stroke, basically a stroked 240, and has a reputation for being a very heavy duty engine. Compare that to the 5.0L(302) V8. It was used in the same vehicle and did well but doesn't have the torque/power that a truck needs. It will get you moving fast but won't get a heavy load going and keep it going as well as the engine that's only 2ci smaller and 2 pistons shorter.

Then I got to thinking about the CTD in our Rams and the original speculation about the Diesel that "WAS" going to be put in the 1500's. I believe I'd read it was to be a V8 and I had to ask why? Why is an inline 6 used in our HD Rams, but the need for a V8 in a 1500? Also, aren't the Ford and GM Diesels V8's? What is the real thought behind a V8 Diesel when it seems obvious that an inline Diesel is better for a Truck?

I don't know.

B-300
05-26-2011, 12:27 PM
I argee on the 300-6. My grandpa had done the upsize from a 240 and he drove it aross the rockies with a 5th wheel.
I was being more general and didn't include the fact that the Turbo on modern diesels tend to mask the V-8 vs 6 torque curve and that early V-8 attempts (GM) were based on gas engines and weaker than a diesel that was designed as a diesel not a conversion like the Olds 350. Also the two rods to a journal was obvious.
Ford has been using the 6.9 or 7.3 International Harvester engine (V-8) designed as a diesel, not a conversion from a gas engine. Not sure on GM.
I don't really know which is the better choice only, that the Cummins inline is survived the test of time.
The modern diesel used in some cars is so quiet you wouldn't even know except for the badges.

Clunk
05-26-2011, 06:37 PM
When I look under the hoods, I look for the alternator, starter and water pump.
I see these easily on my old Cummins and it's not difficult to change them out.
I pulled the cylinder head in 3 hours, turbo in 30 minutes, injectors in 2.5 hours (I'm finicky about disassembly and assembly), starter & alternator & thermostat in less than 30 minutes each.

I can't find these parts on many other trucks without removing a buncha stuff.

.

JohnMcD348
05-26-2011, 09:03 PM
I'm the same way when I look under the hood. The one thing I think of is: What parts are prone to fail over time and how hard am I going to have to work to replace them down the road.

I remember those conversion engines back in the 70's, early 80's. I was still just a kid but I cannot remember 1 person who didn't have a problem with them.

I just don't know if I would trust a V8 diesel to last as long and do as well as an turbo'd inline.

B-300
05-26-2011, 11:31 PM
The long rod inline engine also has less side thrust on the piston and more room for the rings on the piston compared to a V-8 because of packaging room in the engine compartment.
I suspect the reason the change to a V-8 on the 1500 is to meet emission and fuel economy standards for light duty trucks after thinking about it. The V-8 might use a more efficient transmission also, something else to look into.

Clunk
05-27-2011, 06:03 PM
The GM 6.2 & 6.5 was designed a diesel.
The only "conversion" I'm aware of was the Olds, which the blocks were poured so extra heavy that they were used by NHRA Comp racers. In fact an Olds nut can have some fun machining, using these blocks and turn some rpm they can't turn with the gasser blocks.
I just rememberd a V-6 conversion.

JohnMcD348
05-28-2011, 04:13 AM
I had forgotten about the side loading of the V8's as compared to the inlines. That's another reason I think I would avoid one if I intended on keeping it long term. I hope, in the coming years, that Cummins doesn't develop one for our trucks. I look forward to getting one in a few years after my son gets old enough that I give him my truck and buy the new one.

Clunk, I didn't know that the conversions were actually new blocks. I thought the conversions were just new heads and fuel system. I really didn't know how they did the gasser conversions but had always been curious. It just never made since(thinking like the 8 year old boy I was back then) that they could simply convert a gas operating system to a diesel system since I knew just enough back then to know they worked differently.

Autoglass
06-13-2011, 10:09 AM
I just don't know if I would trust a V8 diesel to last as long and do as well as an turbo'd inline.

My .02,,,

As for the difference between V blocks & Inline's. I'm an EX-Trucker here, I've driven both types and basically found no real difference in diesel engines with EXCEPTION of torque of the inline better. Most semi's today use inline 6 turbocharged over the old V8. BUT,,, I've seen some Vblocks that were modified or custom built for show and no go work. For instance I worked for Werner Enterprises for 5 years. They have built show trucks that are both restored and show rigs. From their gas engine 1956 Ford up to CL-2 with a V16 Detroit Diesel!

22+ years
48 States / 3 Provinces of Canada
2.5 Million miles

OH,,,, The V 16?
Twin 8V92 Detroit Diesels bolted together.
@ 900HP
18 sp trans
3.90 ratio gears
MPG????? Nobody knows! It's a show and promotions truck!
BTW, 8" stacks on it, you got to wear ear protectionto drive it!

JohnMcD348
06-14-2011, 08:41 PM
Wow. Now that's just down right Pretty.

Your comment about the inlines vs V being a show engine pretty much confirms what I really suspected about most of them. Pretty much everything I've read since I started learning about my old Ford 300(4.9) in my Bronco has made me believe that it has to be an inline to truly get the job done.

Autoglass
06-15-2011, 01:56 PM
Wow. Now that's just down right Pretty.
Pretty Expensive too !

1 other thing to remember, the "OLD" Detriot Diesel was a 2 stroke vs. the 4 stroke engines of today!
BTW,,, "OLD" was called "Screamin' Demon!"

B-300
06-15-2011, 07:33 PM
And it's Blown rather than turbocharged. That;s were th 6-71 an 8-71 blowers originated from and found there way onto Hemi top-fuel dragsters.

Clunk
06-15-2011, 07:40 PM
The EMD V-16 diesel locomotive engines are pretty impressive.

pzoeller
12-07-2011, 08:44 PM
For the same displacment an inline will have a broader torque curve because 6 cylinders is all they have. (Anymore and the crankshaft will twist.) Because there are fewer cylinders the stroke and/or bore is larger. Ususally the stroke gets the bigger increase and increases torque when compared to the same size V-8.
Also most larger inline 6's are developed for trucks were hood height and engine bay width aren't a problem like in a car so the can use longer rods which broaden the torque curve.

Unless there is something special about the diesels, there have been lots of inline 8's. Chrysler and GM both used to have the, as well as the likes of Duesenberg. Daimler-Benz had quite a few inline 12's (and I think 16's) during the war that they made for the Luftwaffe. Some of those were well over 1000 cubic inches and 1000 hp so I'm sure they would of had problems twisting crankshafts if that were a concern.

I was led to believe that they don't have more than inline 6's anymore because the engines bays aren't long enough but I could be mistaken.......:huh: